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2022: Year in Review

2022: Year in Review

January 04, 2023883 view(s)

As the world awoke from its once-in-a-lifetime pandemic slumber, Russia invaded Ukraine. Unprecedented sanctions followed, provoking several nations to begin de-dollarizing their economies. Record inflation caused central banks to raise interest rates resulting in nearly $7 trillion of U.S. household wealth lost and currency crises around the globe. Many nations around the world are testing central bank digital currencies (CBDC) including China performing the most extensive cross-border test. Cryptocurrencies collapsed as multiple scandals unfolded. OPEC and BRICS countries strengthen alliances after strains in U.S./OPEC relations jeopardized the Petrodollar agreement. Also, despite everything else, the world is overleveraged in mortgaged-backed securities again 2022 was anything but a typical year.

 

Despite all the crises, there were some bright spots as well. Gold and silver showed why they are considered an inflation hedge. They held value when all other markets were negative. The gold price on January 3, 2022, was 1804.01. The current gold price (at the time of writing) is $1814.63. The silver price on January 3, 2022, was $22.92, and today (December 28) is $23.85. Both metals showed some growth and pullback throughout the year. Still, they finished close to where they started the year, protecting purchasing power. 


The following are the five most read and visited articles from 2022. Let us know which was your favorite by liking and sharing the article. 

5. Silver is Setting Up for a Significant Run

On March 22, Bill Slack explored silver's strength considering the Russian invasion of Ukraine. Bill's expert analysis laid out different reasons to believe silver may climb to around $44 in 2024 and nearly $100 by 2027. Some of the data shows an unbalanced relationship to movements in the gold price. Some information shows that 7, 14, 28, and 56-years cycles indicate silver's tremendous upside. 


4. 2022 Burnished Gold and Silver American Eagle

On August 4, the U.S. Gold Bureau announced that Burnished Gold and Silver American Eagles MS70 coins were now available. Collectors and investors love Burnished coins for their rarity and growth potential. Burnished coins are more than 50 times rarer than their bullion counterpart and nearly twice as rare as the coveted proof version. Burnished refers to the process of manufacturing. 

The U.S. Mint has manufactured Burnished American Eagles since 2006. Before mint, the machines roll the raw metal discs (planchettes) in millions of tiny 6mm balls. The burnishing process removes imperfections and creates a stunning matte-like finish. Still, the market has only started noticing within the last few years. The U.S. Gold Bureau decided the market has finally matured enough to recommend the Burnished Eagles to our clients. The U.S. Gold Bureau is only just started using its market position and influence to bring Burnished American Eagles to a large audience. Now is the perfect time to add Burnished American Eagles to a portfolio before the masses. 


3. American Eagle 2022 One Ounce Proof Coin

On April 27, readers were glad to read about the connection between the 2022 Gold American  Eagles and financial independence. The modern rendition of the Augustus Saint-Gaudens Lady Liberty has come to symbolize more than democratic freedoms but also financial freedom for countless global investors. The limited supply of Gold American Eagles makes them a must-have to protect purchasing power and fight against inflation. 


2. Is it Wise to Buy Gold During Times of Rising Inflation

On February 10, we explored if it is wise to buy gold during high inflationary periods. The short answer is that it depends if you have short or long-term goals. The long-term value of gold is empirically undeniable, but the short-term is volatile. Gold has a mixed short-term record during periods of high inflation. However, gold is the undisputed champion of the long game.


1. Is BRICS a Threat to the Dollar

On July 13, Ryan Watkins discussed whether the BRICS nations (Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa) pose a verifiable threat to the Dollar. The BRICS are developing countries united as an economic alliance. They aim to create a basket of commodity-backed currencies to compete against the Dollar. The BRICS are more organized and established than most realize. The BRICS opened multiple banks across borders and are co-funding infrastructure loans in member countries. China and Russia transact in Rubbles and Yuan outside the SWIFT banking system for lumber, food, and energy. BRICS and other countries de-dollarizing is splintering the world into two economies. They are creating significant risks to Dollar-denominated assets.


Which articles did you like best? Let us know by liking and sharing them on social media. At the bottom of every article is a place to like or share it. If you want to like an article, click the heart. If you want to share it, click your preferred social media icon. When you like and share good articles, it helps us decide what content is most valuable and relevant to our readers. Stocks lost around -26%, and bonds lost about -17% in 2022. Cryptos lost -65%. Gold was nominally positive, approximately 0.4%, and silver was up about 4%. More interest rate hikes are coming with predictable losses in equities. The Russian war will continue. Inflation will linger. High-interest rates are destroying the housing market and making home ownership unaffordable. If you could go back to January 1, 2022, what percentage of your assets would you transfer to precious metals? How much do you want to protect going into 2023?

Thank you for being a part of the U.S. Gold Bureau family. May 2023 be the best year of your life (so far). 

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